Renaming a network interface with systemd-networkd on Ubuntu 18.04

On a Ubuntu system where I’m creating a VXLAN Proof of Concept with CloudStack I wanted to rename the interface enp5s0 to cloudbr0.

I found many documentation on the internet on how to do this with *.link files, but I was missing the golden tip, which was you need to re-generate your initramfs.

/etc/systemd/network/50-cloudbr0.link

[Match]
MACAddress=00:25:90:4b:81:54

[Link]
Name=cloudbr0

After you create this file, re-generate your initramfs:

update-initramfs -c -k all

You can now use cloudbr0 in *.network files to use it like any other network interface.

In my case this is how my interfaces look like:

1: lo:  mtu 65536 qdisc noqueue state UNKNOWN group default qlen 1000
    link/loopback 00:00:00:00:00:00 brd 00:00:00:00:00:00
    inet 127.0.0.1/8 scope host lo
       valid_lft forever preferred_lft forever
    inet6 ::1/128 scope host 
       valid_lft forever preferred_lft forever
6: cloudbr0:  mtu 9000 qdisc fq_codel state UP group default qlen 1000
    link/ether 00:25:90:4b:81:54 brd ff:ff:ff:ff:ff:ff
    inet 192.168.0.11/24 brd 192.168.0.255 scope global cloudbr0
       valid_lft forever preferred_lft forever
    inet6 2a00:f10:114:0:225:90ff:fe4b:8154/64 scope global dynamic mngtmpaddr noprefixroute 
       valid_lft 2591993sec preferred_lft 604793sec
    inet6 fe80::225:90ff:fe4b:8154/64 scope link 
       valid_lft forever preferred_lft forever
8: cloudbr1:  mtu 1450 qdisc noqueue state UP group default qlen 1000
    link/ether 86:fa:b6:31:6e:c1 brd ff:ff:ff:ff:ff:ff
    inet 172.16.0.11/24 brd 172.16.0.255 scope global cloudbr1
       valid_lft forever preferred_lft forever
    inet6 fe80::84fa:b6ff:fe31:6ec1/64 scope link 
       valid_lft forever preferred_lft forever
9: vxlan100:  mtu 1450 qdisc noqueue master cloudbr1 state UNKNOWN group default qlen 1000
    link/ether 56:df:29:8d:db:83 brd ff:ff:ff:ff:ff:ff

VXLAN with VyOS and Ubuntu 18.04

VXLAN

Virtual Extensible LAN uses encapsulation technique to encapsulate OSI layer 2 Ethernet frames within layer 4 UDP datagrams. More on this can be found on the link provided.

For a Ceph and CloudStack environment I needed to set up a Proof-of-Concept using VXLAN and some refurbished hardware. The main purpose of this PoC is to verify that VXLAN works with CloudStack, Ceph and Ubuntu 18.04

VyOS

VyOS is an open source network operating system based on Debian Linux. It supports VXLAN, so using this we were able to test VXLAN in this setup.

In production a other VXLAN capable router would be used, but for a PoC VyOS works just fine running on a regular server.

Configuration

The VyOS router is connected to ‘the internet’ with one NIC and the other NIC is connected to a switch.

Using static routes a IPv4 subnet (/24) and a IPv6 subnet (/48) are routed towards the VyOS router. These are then splitted and send to multiple VLANs.

As it took me a while to configure VXLAN under VyOS

I’m only posting that configuration.

interfaces {
    ethernet eth0 {
        address 31.25.96.130/30
        address 2a00:f10:100:1d::2/64
        duplex auto
        hw-id 00:25:90:80:ed:fe
        smp-affinity auto
        speed auto
    }
    ethernet eth5 {
        duplex auto
        hw-id a0:36:9f:0d:ab:be
        mtu 9000
        smp-affinity auto
        speed auto
        vif 300 {
            address 192.168.0.1/24
            description VXLAN
            mtu 9000
        }
    vxlan vxlan1000 {
        address 10.0.0.1/23
        address 2a00:f10:114:1000::1/64
        group 239.0.3.232
        ip {
            enable-arp-accept
            enable-arp-announce
        }
        ipv6 {
            dup-addr-detect-transmits 1
            router-advert {
                cur-hop-limit 64
                link-mtu 1500
                managed-flag false
                max-interval 600
                name-server 2a00:f10:ff04:153::53
                name-server 2a00:f10:ff04:253::53
                other-config-flag false
                prefix 2a00:f10:114:1000::/64 {
                    autonomous-flag true
                    on-link-flag true
                    valid-lifetime 2592000
                }
                reachable-time 0
                retrans-timer 0
                send-advert true
            }
        }
        link eth5.300
        mtu 1500
        vni 1000
    }
    vxlan vxlan2000 {
        address 109.72.91.1/26
        address 2a00:f10:114:2000::1/64
        group 239.0.7.208
        ipv6 {
            dup-addr-detect-transmits 1
            router-advert {
                cur-hop-limit 64
                link-mtu 1500
                managed-flag false
                max-interval 600
                name-server 2a00:f10:ff04:153::53
                name-server 2a00:f10:ff04:253::53
                other-config-flag false
                prefix 2a00:f10:114:2000::/64 {
                    autonomous-flag true
                    on-link-flag true
                    valid-lifetime 2592000
                }
                reachable-time 0
                retrans-timer 0
                send-advert true
            }
        }
        link eth5.300
        mtu 1500
        vni 2000
    }
}

VLAN 300 on eth5 is used to route VNI 1000 and 2000 in their own multicast groups.

The MTU of eth5 is set to 9000 so that the encapsulated traffic of VXLAN can still be 1500 bytes.

Ubuntu 18.04

To test if VXLAN was actually working on the Ubuntu 18.04 host I made a very simple script:

ip link add vxlan1000 type vxlan id 1000 dstport 4789 group 239.0.3.232 dev vlan300 ttl 5
ip link set up dev vxlan1000
ip addr add 10.0.0.11/23 dev vxlan1000
ip addr add 2a00:f10:114:1000::101/64 dev vxlan1000

That works! I can ping 10.0.0.11 and 2a00:f10:114:1000::1 from my Ubuntu 18.04 machine!

Testing with ConfigDrive and cloud-init

cloud-init

cloud-init is a very easy way to bootstrap/configure Virtual Machines running in a cloud environment. It can read it’s metadata from various data sources and configure for public SSH keys or create users for example.

Most large clouds support cloud-init to quickly deploy new Instances.

Config Drive

Config Drive is a data source which reads a local ‘CD-Rom’ device which contains the metadata for the Virtual Machine. This allows for auto configuration of Virtual Machines without them requiring network. My main use case for Config Drive is CloudStack which has support for Config Drive since version 4.11.

I wanted to test with Config Drive outside CloudStack to test some functionality.

meta_data.json

On my laptop I spun up a Ubuntu 18.04 Virtual Machine with cloud-init installed and I attached a ISO which I created.

/home/wido/Desktop/
             cloud-init/
               openstack/
                 latest/
                   meta_data.json

In meta_data.json I put:

{
  "hostname": "ubuntu-test",
  "name": "ubuntu-test",
  "uuid": "0109a241-6fd9-46b6-955a-cd52ad168ee7",
  "public_keys": [
      "ssh-rsa AAAAB3NzaC1yc2EAAAABIwAAAQEAwPKBJDJdlvOKIfilr0VSkF9i3viwLtO8GyCpxL/8TxrGKnEg19LPLN3lwKWbbTqBZgRmbrR3bgQfM4ffPoTCxSPv44eZCF8jMPv8PxpC0yVaTcqW4Q7woD7pjdIuGVImrmEls0U8rS3uGQDx7LhFphkAh+blfUtobqzyHvqcbtVEh+drESn8AXrKd1MZfGg6OB8Xrfdr6d959uHBHFJ8pOxxppYbInxKREPb3XmZzmoNQUmqFRN/VNVTreRHAxDcPM8pEPuNmr3Vp+vDVvfpA58yr2rZ21ASB4LlNOOSEx7vnLd6uH9rsqAJOtr0ZEE29fU609i4rd6Zda2HTGQO+Q== wido@wido-laptop",
      "ssh-rsa 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 wido@wido-desktop"
  ]
}

Using mkisofs I was able to create a ISO and attached it to the VM:

mkisofs -iso-level 3 -V 'CONFIG-2' -o /var/lib/libvirt/images/cloud-init.iso /home/wido/Desktop/cloud-init

The ISO was attached to the Virtual Machine and after reboot I could log in with the user ubuntu over SSH using my pubkey!

Apache CloudStack and MySQL 5.7

SQL Mode

Starting with MySQL 5.7 the default SQL mode is far more strict then it was before.

It now includes ONLY_FULL_GROUP_BY, STRICT_TRANS_TABLES, NO_ZERO_IN_DATE, NO_ZERO_DATE, ERROR_FOR_DIVISION_BY_ZERO, NO_AUTO_CREATE_USER, and NO_ENGINE_SUBSTITUTION.

This can cause problems for applications which need other SQL modes. Apache CloudStack is one of these applications.

The best thing would be to modify the SQL queries executed by CloudStack, but that’s not that easy.

Changing the mode

Luckily the SQL mode can be changed in either the my.conf or as a session variable.

In the my.cnf one can add:

[mysqld]
sql_mode = 'STRICT_TRANS_TABLES,NO_ZERO_IN_DATE,NO_ZERO_DATE,ERROR_FOR_DIVISION_BY_ZERO,NO_AUTO_CREATE_USER,NO_ENGINE_SUBSTITUTION'

Or modify the /etc/cloudstack/management/db.properties file to include this line:

db.cloud.url.params=prepStmtCacheSize=517&cachePrepStmts=true&sessionVariables=sql_mode='STRICT_TRANS_TABLES,NO_ZERO_IN_DATE,NO_ZERO_DATE,ERROR_FOR_DIVISION_BY_ZERO,NO_AUTO_CREATE_USER,NO_ENGINE_SUBSTITUTION'

You should now be able to run a CloudStack management server on MySQL 5.7!

Future

In the future CloudStack should only be using SQL queries which comply with the new more strict SQL mode. In the meantine a issue and Pull Request have been created to track this situation.

ISC Kea DHCPv6 server

DHCPv6

In most situations StateLess Address AutoConfiguration (SLAAC) works just fine when you work with simple clients in a IPv6 network. But in other cases you want to assign pre-defined addresses or prefixes to clients and there DHCPv6 comes in to play.

While working on the IPv6 implementation for Apache CloudStack I found Kea, a DHCPv6 server from ISC.

DHCPv6 DUID

With IPv4 you could easily identify a client based on the MAC-address it send the DHCP request from. With IPv6 there is a DUID. The “DHCP Unique Identifier”. This is generated by the client and then used by the DHCPv6 server. A few possibilities the clients can choose from:

  • DUID-LL: DUID Based on Link-layer Address
  • DUID-LLT: Link-layer Address Plus Time
  • DUID-EN: Assigned by Vendor Based on Enterprise Number

While DUID seems nice, it can’t be dictated by the DHCPv6 server. The client generates the DUID itself and sends it towards the server. Not something you prefer if your are not in control of the clients.

In a cloud you are in control over the MAC-address, so that is what you want to use where possible. It can’t be spoofed by the client.

ISC Kea

Kea is a DHCPv4/DHCPv6 server being developed by the Internet Systems Consortium. It is a extensible and flexible DHCP server. Facebook uses it in their datacenters.

My goal was very simple. Set up Kea and see if I can use it to hand out an address to a client.

Configuration

I download the tarball and tested it with this configuration between two simple KVM VMs on my desktop.

{
    "Dhcp6": {
        "renew-timer": 1000,
        "rebind-timer": 2000,
        "preferred-lifetime": 3000,
        "valid-lifetime": 4000,
        "lease-database": {
            "type": "memfile",
            "persist": true,
            "name": "/tmp/kea-leases6.csv",
            "lfc-interval": 1800
        },
        "interfaces-config": {
            "interfaces": [ "eth1/2001:db8::1" ]
        },
        "mac-sources": ["duid"],
        "subnet6": [
            {
                "subnet": "2001:db8::/64",
                "id": 1024,
                "interface": "eth1",
                "pools": [
                    { "pool": "2001:db8::100-2001:db8::ffff" }
                ],
                "pd-pools": [
                    {
                        "prefix": "2001:db8:fff::",
                        "prefix-len": 48,
                        "delegated-len": 60
                    }
                ],
                "reservations": [
                    {
                        "hw-address": "52:54:00:d6:c2:a9",
                        "ip-addresses": [ "2001:db8::5054:ff:fed6:c2a9" ]
                    }
                ]
            }
        ]
    }
}

Starting Kea with this configuration was rather simple:

Starting Kea

$ kea-dhcp6 -c /etc/kea.json -d

Logs

When it starts you see some interesting bits in the log:

DHCP6_CONFIG_NEW_SUBNET a new subnet has been added to configuration: 2001:db8::/64 with params t1=1000, t2=2000, preferred-lifetime=3000, valid-lifetime=4000, rapid-commit is disabled
DHCPSRV_CFGMGR_ADD_SUBNET6 adding subnet 2001:db8::/64
HOSTS_CFG_ADD_HOST add the host for reservations: hwaddr=52:54:00:d6:c2:a9 ipv6_subnet_id=1024 hostname=(empty) ipv4_reservation=(no) ipv6_reservation0=2001:db8::5054:ff:fed6:c2a9
HOSTS_CFG_GET_ONE_SUBNET_ID_HWADDR_DUID get one host with IPv6 reservation for subnet id 1024, HWADDR hwtype=1 52:54:00:d6:c2:a9, DUID (no-duid)
HOSTS_CFG_GET_ALL_HWADDR_DUID get all hosts with reservations for HWADDR hwtype=1 52:54:00:d6:c2:a9 and DUID (no-duid)
HOSTS_CFG_GET_ALL_IDENTIFIER get all hosts with reservations using identifier: hwaddr=52:54:00:d6:c2:a9
HOSTS_CFG_GET_ALL_IDENTIFIER_COUNT using identifier hwaddr=52:54:00:d6:c2:a9, found 0 host(s)
HOSTS_CFG_GET_ONE_SUBNET_ID_HWADDR_DUID_NULL host not found using subnet id 1024, HW address hwtype=1 52:54:00:d6:c2:a9 and DUID (no-duid)
HOSTS_CFG_GET_ONE_SUBNET_ID_ADDRESS6 get one host with reservation for subnet id 1024 and including IPv6 address 2001:db8::5054:ff:fed6:c2a9
HOSTS_CFG_GET_ALL_SUBNET_ID_ADDRESS6 get all hosts with reservations for subnet id 1024 and IPv6 address 2001:db8::5054:ff:fed6:c2a9
HOSTS_CFG_GET_ALL_SUBNET_ID_ADDRESS6_COUNT using subnet id 1024 and address 2001:db8::5054:ff:fed6:c2a9, found 0 host(s)
HOSTS_CFG_GET_ONE_SUBNET_ID_ADDRESS6_NULL host not found using subnet id 1024 and address 2001:db8::5054:ff:fed6:c2a9
DHCPSRV_MEMFILE_DB opening memory file lease database: lfc-interval=1800 name=/tmp/kea-leases6.csv persist=true type=memfile universe=6
DHCPSRV_MEMFILE_LEASE_FILE_LOAD loading leases from file /tmp/kea-leases6.csv

You can see it has one reservation based on the MAC-address of the client which it handed out after it booted:

ALLOC_ENGINE_V6_HR_ADDR_GRANTED reserved address 2001:db8::5054:ff:fed6:c2a9 was assigned to client duid=[00:01:00:01:1e:47:7e:66:52:54:00:d6:c2:a9], tid=0xe7899a

Ubuntu client

The client was a simple Ubuntu 14.04 client with this network configuration:

auto eth0
iface eth0 inet dhcp
iface eth0 inet6 dhcp

And indeed, it obtained the correct address:

root@ubuntu1404:~# ip addr show dev eth0
2: eth0:  mtu 1500 qdisc pfifo_fast state UP group default qlen 1000
    link/ether 52:54:00:d6:c2:a9 brd ff:ff:ff:ff:ff:ff
    inet 192.168.100.100/24 brd 192.168.100.255 scope global eth0
       valid_lft forever preferred_lft forever
    inet6 2001:db8::5054:ff:fed6:c2a9/64 scope global deprecated dynamic 
       valid_lft 62sec preferred_lft 0sec
    inet6 fe80::5054:ff:fed6:c2a9/64 scope link 
       valid_lft forever preferred_lft forever
root@ubuntu1404:~#

Lease database

Kea can store the leases in a CSV file or MySQL database if you want. In this test I used /tmp/kea-leases6.csv as a CSV file to store the leases in.

In production a MySQL database is probably easier to use, but for the test CSV worked just fine.

Installing and testing NixOS

NixOS

NixOS is a minimal and flexible Linux distribution which doesn’t use any of the existing package manager.

NixOS is a Linux distribution with a unique approach to package and configuration management. Built on top of the Nix package manager, it is completely declarative, makes upgrading systems reliable, and has many other advantages.

I wanted to test NixOS and see if it could be a candidate for a very minimal KVM hypervisor running just Qemu, libvirt and Apache CloudStack.

With this post I just wanted to share how you can quickly install NixOS inside a VirtualBox VM.

VirtualBox

On my desktop and laptop I usually use VirtualBox to quickly test something inside Virtual Machines. In this case I downloaded the NixOS minimal 64-bit ISO and created a VM:

  • 1024MB of memory
  • 8GB SATA disk
  • NixOS ISO attached

Installation

After you start the VM it will boot from the ISO. You will then find yourself in a root prompt saying just nixos.

The first step is to format your disk and mount it under /mnt.

parted /dev/sda mklabel msdos
parted /dev/sda mkpart primary 0% 100%
mkfs.xfs /dev/sda1
mount /dev/sda1 /mnt

If you have that done you can run:

nixos-generate-config

This will generate /mnt/etc/nixos/configuration.nix from where you can configure your OS.

This is what I used as my configuration:

{ config, pkgs, ... }:

{
  imports = [
      ./hardware-configuration.nix
    ];

  boot.loader.grub.enable = true;
  boot.loader.grub.version = 2;
  boot.loader.grub.device = "/dev/sda";

  boot.kernelPackages = pkgs.linuxPackages_4_1;

  time.timeZone = "Europe/Amsterdam";

  networking.firewall.enable = false;

  environment.systemPackages = with pkgs; [
    wget git screen ceph
  ];

  services.openssh.enable = true;
  services.openssh.permitRootLogin = "yes";

  virtualisation.libvirtd.enable = true;
  virtualisation.libvirtd.extraOptions = ["-l"];
  virtualisation.libvirtd.extraConfig = "listen_tls = 0\nlisten_tcp = 1";

  system.stateVersion = "15.09";
}

A minimal installation with just OpenSSH and libvirt installed.

Now you can actually install NixOS:

nixos-install

After a few minutes you will be prompted for a root-password and that’s it!

Reboot and you have a running NixOS installation 🙂

Rebuilding libvirt under CentOS 7.1 with RBD storage pool support

If you want to use CentOS 7.1 for your hypervisors with Apache CloudStack and Ceph’s RBD as Primary Storage you need to rebuild libvirt.

CloudStack requires libvirt to be built with RBD storage pool support. It uses libvirt to manage RBD volumes. By default libvirt under CentOS is not built with this support. (On Ubuntu it is btw).

Rebuilding from source

First we need to install a couple of packages:

$ yum install -y rpm-build gcc make ceph-devel

Now we need to download the sRPM:

$ wget http://vault.centos.org/centos/7.1.1503/os/Source/SPackages/libvirt-1.2.8-16.el7.src.rpm

Create a rpmbuild directory:

$ mkdir /root/rpmbuild

Now edit /root/.rpmmacros so that it contains:

%_topdir    /root/rpmbuild

Install the sRPM:

$ rpm -i libvirt-1.2.8-16.el7.src.rpm

Open the /root/rpmbuild/SPECS/libvirt.spec file and look for:

%else
    %define with_storage_rbd      0
%endif

Change this to:

%else
    %define with_storage_rbd      1
%endif

Now build the RPM:

$ cd /root/rpmbuild
$ rpmbuild -ba SPECS/libvirt.spec

After a couple of minutes you should have RPMs with RBD storage pool support enabled!

PowerDNS backend for a global RADOS Gateway namespace

At my hosting company PCextreme we are building a cloud offering based on Ceph and CloudStack. We call our cloud services Aurora.

Our cloud services are composed out of two components: Compute and Objects.

For our Aurora Objects service we use the RADOS Gateway from Ceph and we are using the Federated Config to create multiple regions.

At this moment we have one region o.auroraobjects.eu but we soon want to expand to multiple regions.

One of the things we/I wanted is a global namespace for all our regions: o.auroraobjects.com.

By design the RADOS Gateway will return a HTTP-redirect when you connect to the ‘wrong’ region for a specific bucket, but a HTTP-redirect causes extra TCP packets going over the wire causing additional and unneeded latency.

So I came up with the idea of using a custom PowerDNS backend to direct bucket traffic on DNS level.

Imagine having a bucket ceph in the region ‘eu’ and the global namespace o.auroraobjects.com.

Using my custom backend the PowerDNS server will respond with a CNAME pointing the user towards the right hostname:

wido@wido-laptop:~$ host ceph.o.auroraobjects.com ns1.auroraobjects.com
Using domain server:
Name: ns1.auroraobjects.com
Address: 2a00:f10:121:400:48c:2ff:fe00:e6b#53
Aliases: 

ceph.o.auroraobjects.com is an alias for ceph.o.auroraobjects.eu.
wido@wido-laptop:~$

As you can see it responded with a CNAME pointing towards ceph.o.auroraobjects.eu.

This allows us to create multiple regions (eu, us, asia, etc) but keep one global namespace to make it easy to consume for our end-users.

Users can create a bucket in the region they like, but they never have to worry about wich hostname to use. We take care of that.

This PowerDNS backend is in the Ceph master branch and can be installed as a WSGI application behind Apache.

I’ve put a small txt file online to show you:

As you can see, both URLs show you the same object.

Deploying the backend for PowerDNS is fairly simply, I recommend you read the README, but here are a few config snippets.

Apache VirtualHost


	ServerAdmin webmaster@localhost

	DocumentRoot /var/www
	
		Options FollowSymLinks
		AllowOverride None
	
	
		Options Indexes FollowSymLinks MultiViews
		AllowOverride None
		Order allow,deny
		allow from all
	

	ErrorLog ${APACHE_LOG_DIR}/error.log
	LogLevel warn
	CustomLog ${APACHE_LOG_DIR}/access.log combined

	WSGIScriptAlias / /var/www/pdns-backend-rgw.py

PowerDNS configuration

local-address=0.0.0.0
local-ipv6=::

cache-ttl=60
default-ttl=60
query-cache-ttl=60

launch=remote
remote-connection-string=http:url=http://localhost/dns

Note: You have to compile PowerDNS manually with –with-modules=remote –enable-remotebackend-http

Don’t forget to put a rgw-pdns.conf in /etc/ceph with the correct configuration.

This is still a work-in-progress on my side and I’ll probably make some commits in the coming months, but feedback is much appreciated!

SQL connection error after upgrade to CloudStack 4.3.0

I just upgraded a small cluster of mine from CloudStack 4.2.1 to 4.3.0 and after installing the packages on my Ubuntu system the management server wouldn’t start due to a SQL error:

2014-03-25 20:52:13,643 INFO  [c.c.u.d.T.Transaction] (main:null) Is Data Base High Availiability enabled? Ans : false
2014-03-25 20:52:13,736 ERROR [c.c.u.d.Merovingian2] (main:null) Unable to get a new db connection
java.sql.SQLException: No suitable driver found for jdbc:mysql://localhost:3306/cloud?autoReconnect=true&prepStmtCacheSize=517&cachePrepStmts=true
	at java.sql.DriverManager.getConnection(DriverManager.java:635)
	at java.sql.DriverManager.getConnection(DriverManager.java:195)

I quickly remembered a licensing issue around JDBC which delayed 4.3.0 and I was right. The management server was missing the right JAR/package for the SQL connection.

A quick apt-get install fixed it:

$ sudo apt-get install libmysql-java

This should have been a dependency of the ‘cloudstack-management’ package, but that somehow slipped through. I already applied a patch in the master branch and I’ll make sure it gets into 4.3.1 and 4.4.0.

So if you are running Ubuntu and are upgrading to CloudStack 4.3.0 and run into this issue, simply install the package and it’s fixed.

CloudStack: The given command does not exist or it is not available for user

So I was working on CloudStack today and I build new packages from the 4.2 branch to test some new things for the Ceph integration.

After installing the new packages and restarting my management server I wasn’t able to log on anymore. This is what I got:

The given command does not exist or it is not available for user

It took me quite some time to figure out what was going on, but after turning on MySQL logging it turned out that I was missing a column in a database. This setup is a dev setup where I build packages on a daily basis and perform a lot of database changes manually.

The problem was that my database was out of sync with what the code expected it to be. When you go from version A to B the management server will upgrade the database accordingly, but I went from version B to B, which did have some database changes, but weren’t taken care of by the DatabaseUpgradeChecker, which makes perfectly sense since this is a dev server.

So should you encounter this message at some point, turn on MySQL query logging and see the queries it tries to do. You’ll probably see that one of them is failing.

This causes the whole management server not to start properly.